Are You In Need Of A Smile?

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A few weeks ago, I downloaded the U.S. Supreme Court’s opinion in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin on my e-reader so I could read it during my commute.

I share this account with my 8-year-old twins.  One of them said: “Fisher is the most boring book ever. It’s just about some girl who couldn’t get into college.”

I can’t believe she read enough of the opinion to know what the case was about!

I’ve been thinking about the Fisher decision as the events of this past week have highlighted how much race matters. For more on this topic, see The Supreme Court’s Affirmative Action Case Reminds Us Why #WeNeedDiverseBooks.

19 thoughts on “Are You In Need Of A Smile?

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    1. I still think about this post when I need a smile (today was a bit rough for me). I’m glad you got a smile out of it too. Sorry for not responding to your comment earlier!

  5. This made me laugh, and my lawyer wife loved it! I like that court decisions can be read as literature, and I like that your daughter’s assessment (from what I know about the case) is pretty accurate!

    1. I’m glad you both enjoyed it! My daughter read about 13% of the opinion and understood enough of it to know generally what it was about. I’m amazed she kept reading after the first line of the syllabus: “The University of Texas at Austin (University) uses an undergraduate admissions system containing two components.” That’s a pretty dull sentence!

    1. Yes, I have to be careful! At the same time, though, I’m not too worried that they might read books that aren’t age appropriate for them. Most of it will just go over their heads.

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